250-334-4613. Corner of 5th and Cliffe, Downtown Courtenay, B.C. ~ parking at rear of building off 6th st. ~
The sky is falling The sky is falling – Annual RED DOT Sale

The sky is falling The sky is falling – Annual RED DOT Sale

 

RED DOT SALE at The Potters Place Jan 11-31 2016

The RED DOT sale at The Potters Place is our biggest sale of the year. In fact, we know that many of our customers who buy through out the year are also sure to come back about this time in January because the Gallery is full of RED DOTS.  These are put on pots that are sold at a discount – the one time of the year that we do this.

Potters have been clearing and cleaning up their studios and bringing in pottery that is gorgeous, but they are just clearing out shelves of old and making room to make more pots.  Every pot we sell is a first – no seconds here.  The glaze may be a test glaze, or the design may be a design that the potter is no longer making or … may be just beginning to work out an idea of a new line.  You may find a bowl that is a one of as all of it’s other “set mates” have all sold.

After the holidays, January is the perfect time to trim the fat! January 11-31, 2016, the Potters Place holds their annual HUGE January sale with prices that’ll make your jaw drop.   OUR RED DOT SALE is our way of saying thank you to this wonderful valley, which continues to be so supportive of local artists like those potters of the Potters Place.   We love that you have made us your GO-TO gallery and shop when you have gifts to give or when you have visitors visiting from away and want to show them the wonderful local art available in the valley.

Local potters trim their studio shelves of all sorts of pots ready for the new season of making ahead

The Comox Valley is the pottery mecca of British Columbia and in appreciation of your support; we wish to invite you to this very special sale. Many potters will bring new works into the shop and place sale prices between 10-70 percent off.  All these pots are perfect, no seconds. A Beautiful selection of pottery will be dramatically reduced during January with partial proceeds going to some of our favourite charities in the valley. We continue to support our local food bank, Y.A.N.A., Potters helping Potters and others.

This once a year special event at the Potters Place is when potters clear out older stock or items that are made of a glaze that they may no longer be using. Sometimes a potter just wants to clear shelves of inventory to make room for the next set of pottery to be made. These are all wonderful pieces from t-pots to mugs, to butter dishes, to vases to platters and everything in between. When you come in, feel free to bring with a non-perishable food item so that we can help our local food bank to continue to help put food on the table – even after the turkey dinner holidays.

The Potter’s Place is at 180B Fifth St. on the corner of Fifth and Cliffe in the cultural heart of downtown Courtenay in the Potters Courtyard.

It’s open Mondays to Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Parking is available at the Rear of the building along the fence.
For more information, call 250-334-4613

Charlotte Schaufelbühl – Featured Artist – November, 2015

Charlotte Schaufelbühl – Featured Artist – November, 2015


Charlotte Schaufelbühl’s pottery is full of folk imagery and brushwork. Her strong designs stem from her European roots. Imagine beautiful batik canvases. When you see Charlotte’s functional high fired pottery, you will notice that she employs similar techniques using wax as a resist from one glaze to another.

You will no doubt recognize her work the minute you see it.  She makes very distinct and beautifully crafted mugs, bowls, butter dishes, teapots, casserole dishes etc. etc. charolette_with_bowl
Charlotte’s work will be on display throughout November, 2015 at the Potters Place.

We know that  Christmas carols have begun to fill the airwaves… There are so many wonderful gifts just waiting for you to choose from at the Potters Place. This year, we want to thank you in advance, for considering a handmade, one of a kind, locally crafted piece of pottery from one of your neighbours in the Comox Valley… a local potter.

We are located at the corner of 5th and Cliffe at the 5th Street Courtyard in the heart of downtown Courtenay.
Monday – Friday, 10-5. Parking at the rear along the fence.

 

 

 

FEBRUARY 2015 – TEAPOTS TEAPOTS

FEBRUARY 2015 – TEAPOTS TEAPOTS

 ​A TEA POT FILLED WITH LOVE at The Potters Place during February 2015
teapot-urn-blue-chattered-sandler-web
What is really in your Tea Pot?
The latest survey results have just been published and the findings are absolutely, undeniably the most unexpected results from the research team comprised of Canadian, European, Asian, South Asian and American researchers, just to name a few.  The survey was an analysis of Teapots in almost every country in the world, and it is very clear, though never documented or disclosed until now… The main ingredient contained in a Teapot is Are you sitting down?

LOVE.
Okay, maybe the Potters at The Potters Place in Courtenay are telling only a half-truth here.  You are right, there was no recent study conducted, nor article or findings published with regards to Teapots, but… nonetheless… We all know that LOVE IS exactly what you find in every handmade Teapot.

During the month of February at the Potters Place, Teapots will be exhibited in our FEATURES window.  We are having our annual Teapot Show.

Close your eyes for a moment, imagine your grandmother and you sitting down and sharing a cup of tea together, telling her some important news, or asking her some important question and watching her sip her tea.  She takes a quiet breath in, then looks at you with loving, knowing eyes and says… it’ll all be okay my dear.  When did you last do that together?  Was it last month, or last year, or perhaps it was over 60 years ago.  Remember her looking at you with all that love, and just sharing that perfect moment with her and a pot of tea.

Keep your eyes closed for another moment and see yourself with your best friend, or your neighbour, your partner, husband or wife.  See yourself taking time from the busyness around you to boil the water, steep the tea, pour it and prepare it just the way you like. Sharing a pot of tea often includes an act of “connection”; of taking a moment for yourself and for each other.  How many smiles have you shared over a cup of tea.  If you skype or facetime with friends and family far away, do you make a pot of tea first so you can settle in for a ‘long one’?

Now… all that love has to be held in something that functions well too.

There is a lot that goes into the making of a handmade Teapot.  It is quite a lengthy process and there are many components that have to work together in order for your teapot to feel good and pour well.  Below are just a few:

1.     Wedge several pounds of clay together the way you kneed dough.  Separate the clay into 3 sections – the body, the lid and the spout.  Wedge more clay for the handle… more on that later.

2.     Throw on a potters wheel or hand-build the body with an appropriate seat for the lid to rest in or on.  This body must not be too thick or weighty, because once filled with hot liquid, it will be even heavier and uncomfortable to handle hot.

3.     Make a lid that will not fall off the pot when you tilt/pour your tea.  There may be a deeper inset on the lid, or a tab to secure the lid under the seat of the pot to catch the lid from falling off, or there may be point of contact like a knob or touchstone for the user to hold onto to keep the lid in place.  Cut a hole in the teapot lid for aiding the ease of pouring.beardsley2_small

4.     A handle may be attached on the side of the pot opposite the spout or may be attached overhead.  The handle may be made from clay, or from bamboo, or other woods.  The placement and size of the handle must be very carefully considered.  An ill designed handle can make a teapot very uncomfortable to hold and pour.  A potter needs to consider the fulcrum – or find the balancing point so that the teapot is comfortable to hold and pour. Wedge the appropriate amount of clay, “pull’ a handle until it is the desired thickness and length – (PULLING is a technical pottery term and it can resemble letting a dog or cats tail pass through your hand in an almost fist position many many times)

5.     The attachment of the handle is a whole other piece.  If it is an overhead handle, there must be consideration, making certain there is enough space for the lid to fit without touching the handle, enough space to get both a hand in to remove the lid, and free access to fill the teapot with water and enough space for your hand to clean the interior of the teapot. A clay handle may be a coil, a slab, extruded, or “pulled”.

6.     There may be a choice by the potter to add a ‘balancing lug’ or mini handle near the spout so that both hands may be used to help balance and pour hot tea.

7.     The spout – This can be thrown or hand-built.  If thrown on a potter’s wheel, the placement on the teapot must take into consideration the torque or spin that occurred during the throwing process.  During the firing process in the kiln, the spout will continue to twist slightly as if it were still going round and round on the potter’s wheel.  This will show up after the firing with the end of the spout being in a slightly different position than it was in when it was originally attached to the pot.  This can be confusing, and something that a potter needs to take into consideration when attaching a spout to a teapot.  The potter needs to make allowances for the continuation of the spin.  The spouts opening or end, also must be positioned high enough above the “fill water mark” so that the tea pot doesn’t start pouring, before you do.  Several holes or one large hole needs to be cut through the body at the spout connection to allow for an easy flow of water, but also needs to take into consideration tea bags, tea leaves, and the turbulence of the water stream.  You want the tea to pour out nicely, not glug glug glug out.  You also don’t want the tea bags or tea leaves to stop the flow of water out. The inside of the spout must be crafted in such a way as to encourage free flow.Sheffelbuhl_teapot

8.     The attachment of the spout to the body may be obvious with something that may look like a seam where the spout and the body meet, or it may be blended together making it look like one piece.

9.     The lid and the seat of the body where the lid sits need to be waxed in order to repel any glaze or the two parts will fuse together during the firing.

This is only a brief summary of what goes into making a handmade teapot.
As always, we thank you, our community for your ongoing support.  We at the Potters Place are committed to bring you and your visitors, beautiful handmade local pottery at affordable prices.

If you heard Stuart McLean of the Vinyl Café recently here at the Sid Williams theatre, you know that he absolutely loves The Potters Place and knows what an amazing treasure we have right here in the Comox Valley!

Come see “A Tea Pot Filled With Love”. A beautiful assortment of teapots made by local potters right here in the Comox Valley, as our FEATURE throughout February 2015

The Potters Place is located at the Potters Courtyard, in the cultural heart of Downtown Courtenay.  10 – 5 pm Monday-Saturday.
Parking located at rear of the building along the fence.